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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
-fire. netanyahu said israel is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend itself. and egypt, which is brokering a deal between the two sides, cancelled a press conference where officials were expected to announce a deal with terms for a cease-fire. tomorrow, secretary clinton meets with the palestinian president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a buildi
by population? it turns out it's not at all a close call. it's egypt, by a lot. more than one in five people in the middle east is egyptian. it's not the richest country, it's not geographically in the middle, but it is the center of gravity for both population and the politics of that whole blessed region. geographically, more toward the middle of the whole middle east is the nation of israel, comparatively tiny. if you want to understand where the fighting is centered, you have to zoom in even further to a whole different scale to even be able to see what the relevant border is over which this fighting is happening. looking at it in that context, you might ask, what's that giant border right next to this relativity tiny place being fought over? that's egypt. that's the egyptian border right up next to this tiny strip of land where the fighting is happening in gaza. that's why part of why this was such a big deal. egypt and israel shaking hands. thank you jimmy carter. the peace treaty between this important country, the nation of israel. but jimmy carter, it turns out, is not only the only
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
's going on with egypt, the united states annually gives roughly $2 billion to egypt and something that senator graham made clear over the weekend is to remind egypt everyone is watching their steps. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> so is this a big test for morsi to prove not only that they are a partner to the united states, but an ally moving forward? >> well, they have been a treaty ally since '79. there's roughly $2 billion in aid given to egypt every year. $2 billion isn't quite what it used to be. so if this is the one piece of leverage that we have over egypt, that's not going to work. what we -- >> even in an economy that's totally failing and upside down for egypt, it's -- $2 billion is not an incentive to want to play nice? >> i don't think that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be
maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demands but need to work that out. >> stephanie gosk, you're in israel where we've experienced -- they've
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
by the united states and instead they find egypt, turkey, other countries of the region, are playing a much more proactive role in the crisis. >> hillary clinton will be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah in the west bank. a lot of observers say that's a face-saving move to help him out. sort of been sidelined in all of this, who comes out in the group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens? what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with pat stillian groups? the u.s. doesn't recognize hamas. been trying to deal with the palestinian authority. but if they have lost power, what does that mean moving forward to getting a longer term peace deal? >> to be honest, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead the palestinian people have known six decades of futility. never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own lives. never have diplomatic answers. so i think now the hamas people will have their moment in the sun. there will be people that will come to them. visitors from afar. the turks will come in, a
to create a moral equivalency. i think a ground war is obviously going to test where is egypt, where is turkey. we know where iran is. they are arming the hamas, missiles or a lot of them seem to come out of iran. in essence, it seems to me that something pro joked by iran and encouraged by egypt and turkey by immediately taking the side of hamas which is extraordinary. >> greta: so, with hamas in order to get them to step down from its firing rockets into israel and doing provocative, take at hamas. why in the world they are going reach with truce. they are consumed with hatred toward israel. they were very tight and close to iran. today they identified six people who they felt were conspiring with the israelis. they executed them and dragged one body through the streets. they used civilians as shields. where in the world is if i do strike a temporary deal, why in the world would you ever think it would stick or hold? >> you would have to be totally unrealistic. the secretary-general's comments everybody should show restraint is absurd. if somebody lobbed 130 bombs on new york we wo
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
where america's allegiance is. test for mohammed morsi in egypt. a test for the turks. the turkish prime minister came out and said israel is terrorist group, not hamas. so they are feeling this out. in my opinion, they are feeling out what would happen if it were israeli-iran and i think it's -- we should be concerned here. the middle east is not siding with the right sides now. >> dana: what about that, bob, when the turkish prime minister says that israel is the terrorist state? does that surprise you? >> bob: it doesn't surprise me because turkey is having a massive internal conflict between muslims and the secular community and the muslim community. but they still have the most stable and necessary of all countries in the area. it would be necessary to have it work. one of the things -- i want to give netanyahu some credit here for showing some restraint. you mentioned this yesterday and i think in the face of this, they have shown a lot of restraint. one thing they need to do is what the gazans want to get the blockade lifted on the sea ports. israel is in control of them. i think
the weapons to egypt and hold the egyptian government responsible for hamas abide big the truce. so it is not about what both sides don't want, because they both want to avoid war, but what they want to come out of this appearing victorious or at least gained within their own political frameworks, and this is what is difficult for the egyptian media to bring these two sides together. >> thank you, so much from gaza. be safe. >>> and now to the middle east where president obama is now in cambodia, the third and the final stop on a multiday and multicountry tour. the president arrived in cambodia at 5:00 a.m. eastern time, and becoming the first sitting u.s. president to visit there. while in cambodia, the president is going to be meeting with a leaders at a dinner of the asian summit. and yesterday he made a historic meeting in myanmar where he met with parliament elected leader aun san suu kyi. >> this is not an endorsement of the burmese government, but it is an acknowledgment that there is a process under way inside of that country that even a year and a half, two years ago, nobod
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
. now to egypt where the country's new president is winning big-time praise from the u.s. for helping to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the ne
of state hillary clinton is in egypt. earlier she met with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and prime minister netanyahu and had this to say. >> america's commitment to israel is rock solid and unwavering. the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. gregg: general jack keane is a four star general retired. general, great to see you. this is shuttle diplomacy. she has been in jerusalem, ramallah, now cairo. can a cease-fire be brokered here? >> i don't think she would be here unless they believed a cease-fire can be obtained. i also believe she is here because they had legitimate concerns about netanyahu going on the ground in gaza. >> what does hamas wants out of this? >> they want open borders, access to those borders in a way they don't have them now. they want the naval blockade removed. they want a significant improvement in trade. >> reporter: wouldn't that facilitate even more smuggling of rockets into gaza most of them made by iran. >> they are pushing them through africa, into the sinai, and that
. the president of the united states is deeply sloughed with this. he's speaking with the leaders of egypt. he's hoping that the government of qatar, of turkey, all of whom have good relations with hamas in gaza, that they can convince hamas to stop the launching of these rockets and missiles into israel. if they stop the israelis will stop their strikes against them and then they can begin, hopefully down the road, to achieve some long range solution that's going to be very, very difficult, as all of us know. but the prime minister of israel, benjamin netanyahu, convened his cabinet here in jerusalem today. he made it clear in a public statement that if the rockets keep coming in, the israelis have already stood on standby 75,000 ground forces, reservists, 30,000 of them already have been activated during training exercises not far from gaza. and they'll go in, as brutal and as ugly and as horrendous as that might be. they might go in. they don't want to do that because it will cause an enormous amount of pain all around and the israelis have had a relatively poor experience in gaza four year
they sat down at the negotiating table. of course, with egypt as a immediatier, with the israelis. this time around, they were able to have at least some of their demands be met. first and foremost among those was that the border crossings order, that there is an easing of movement, of people, of goods. and then of course for both sides, it was stopping the violence. the israelis wanted to see an end to the rockets being launched at their population. the palestinians, hamas, wanted to see an end to israel's targeted assassinations to what they call israeli aggression against them. so for many here, this time around versus four years ago, they were able to actually, with an intermediary, again, negotiate a cease-fire. in the sense that they were able to force the israeli side to agree to some of their terms. but we'll have to see if those critical details are, in fact, implemented. will the border crossings really open? will the sea ports really be open? will people be able to have that freedom of movement that they are looking for? this is still, very much, as you say, a first ste
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)